How LinkedIn Killed Your Resume

By: , On Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

linkedin

For years we have been taught that having an up to date CV highlighting your skills and qualifications in an easy and concise manner is essential when job hunting. However, with the development of the internet a whole new way for individuals to develop and present their own personal brand has opened up. With social media and profiles on LinkedIn now readily accessible, how you appear online is an important part of how you come across to potential employers. It’s important that you get your LinkedIn profile right so that you have a chance of standing out in a crowded marketplace. Most employers are busy and can sometimes be handling hundreds of applications during the recruiting process so anything that highlights you from others is a bonus and may mean you are shifted further up the list.

You need to consider your participation in discussions and blogs both on LinkedIn and elsewhere – your publicly available social media photos and tweets are all part of the impression that goes out to big wide world. So think twice if you are joking around and post a crude comment or inappropriate private photo. What you have on your LinkedIn profile, who you are connected to online and comments they have made about you are all part of the whole collection that potential employers use to form a more rounded view of you – call it your ‘digital resume’.

Not only that, but it allows for an easier recruitment process. A lot of recruiters use smartapps that connect to LinkedIn so that when a job is advertised, applicants can use their LinkedIn profile to instantly apply instead of providing a resume. This means that recruiters have the most accurate and up to date applicant information over a traditional resume and can use it throughout the recruiting process.

May recruiters, such as Just Digital People , rely on people having their information on a cloud based system like LinkedIn so that is readily available and so that they are comparing “apples to apples” in candidate comparisons through their tracking systems.

So while it is important to have a resume that is concise and summarises your attributes well, your LinkedIn profile, who you connect to and who you can get to ‘recommend’ or confirm your skills online may be the most beneficial thing working for you when you apply for a job.

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